Media Law through Science Fiction
Do Androids Dream of Electric Free Speech?

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Language: Anglais
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Media Law through Science Fiction
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· 15.2x22.9 cm · Paperback

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Media Law through Science Fiction
Publication date:
· 15.2x22.9 cm · Hardback
Science fiction offers us plausible future worlds as a laboratory in which we can study human nature and thus many of the challenges media law scholars and policy makers will face in the future may have already been explored by science fiction writers. This book is an attempt to look at the future of communication technology and the policy debates ahead--to lay the groundwork for the laws and regulations and judicial decisions to come. What is the traditional role of science fiction, and how has it fit into cultural understanding and policy debates in the past? What is the traditional role of law and policy scholarship, and how can it be adjusted to be more meaningful in debates about use and limitations involving future technology? Relying on some of the masters of science fiction, Daxton Stewart here examines these questions and more.

Foreword by Malka Older

Preface

1. Science Fiction, Technology, and Policy

2. The Future of Copyright Law, Both Real and Virtual

3. Privacy in the Perpetual Surveillance State

4. Do Androids Dream of Electric Free Speech?

5. Vanishing Speech and Destroying Works

6. Law, the Universe, and Everything

Daxton R. "Chip" Stewart, Ph.D., J.D., LL.M., is a professor of Journalism in the Bob Schieffer College of Communication at Texas Christian University. He has more than 15 years of professional experience in news media and public relations and has been a licensed attorney since 1998. His recent scholarship has focused on the intersection of social media and the law, including the book Social Media and the Law (2nd ed., Routledge 2017).