Mechanisms and Manifestations of Obesity in Lung Disease

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Language: Anglais
Cover of the book Mechanisms and Manifestations of Obesity in Lung Disease

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352 p. · 19.1x23.5 cm · Paperback

Mechanisms and Manifestations of Obesity in Lung Disease is a complete resource for the epidemiology and molecular mechanisms related to obesity and lung disease. Obesity has not simply changed the epidemiology of pulmonary disease

1. Obesity and Lung Function 2. Epidemiology of Obesity and Obstructive Airway Diseases 3. Mechanistic Insights from Human Studies of Asthma and COPD 4. The Relevance of Animal Models for the Study of Obesity-Induced Asthma 5. Metabolic Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea 6. Obesity and Pulmonary Hypertension 7. Obesity and Infectious Diseases 8. Obesity and Acute Lung Injury 9. Adipose Tissue Metabolism in Obesity 10. Metabolic Control of Immune Cells 11. Obesity and the Microbiome 12. Lipoproteins as Inflammatory Mediators 13. Obesity-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and the Risk of Disease

adult and pediatric pulmonologists, adult and pediatric intensivists, Ph.D. scientists, pulmonary and critical care subspecialty fellows, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students.

Richard A. Johnston is assistant professor of pediatrics, adjunct assistant professor of integrative biology and pharmacology, and associate member at The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in Houston. He is a member of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, American Thoracic Society and American Physiological Society. He has reviewed for over 15 scientific journals and holds editorial positions on 2 current journals. Dr. Johnston’s major areas of research include obesity and lung disease, air pollution, respiratory mechanics, and acute lung injury
Dr. Suratt is a professor of Medicine and Cell & Molecular Biology; Vice Chair of Medicine for Academic Affairs; Associate Chief, Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine; Associate Director, Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Training Program in the Department of Medicine at the University of Vermont. He is an active member of over 10 professional organizations including the Society of Critical Care Medicine, American Thoracic Society and the American College of Chest Physicians. Dr. Suratt's research career has focused on the role of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of critical illness, particularly ARDS. His recent work has focused on host factors, such as obesity and genetic polymorphisms, and their influence on inflammatory response in the development of and outcomes from critical illness. He has clinical expertise in Pulmonary complications of Cancer Survivorship and General Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine.