Agrobacterium Protocols (2nd Ed., 2nd ed. 2006)
Volume I

Methods in Molecular Biology Series, Vol. 343

Coordinator: Wang Kan

Language: Anglais

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Agrobacterium Protocols (2nd Ed.)
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484 p. · 15.2x22.9 cm · Paperback

189.89 €

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Agrobacterium protocols Vol. 1 (2nd Ed.) POD
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480 p. · 15.5x23.5 cm · Hardback
Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a soil bacterium that for more than a century has been known as a pathogen causing the plant crown gall disease. Unlike many other pathogens, Agrobacterium has the ability to deliver DNA to plant cells and permanently alter the plant genome. The discovery of this unique feature 30 years ago has provided plant scientists with a powerful tool to genetically transform plants for both basic research purposes and for agricultural development. Compared to physical transformation methods such as particle bomba- ment or electroporation, Agrobacterium-mediated DNA delivery has a number of advantages. One of the features is its propensity to generate a single or a low copy number of integrated transgenes with defined ends. Integration of a single transgene copy into the plant genome is less likely to trigger ?gene silencing? often associated with multiple gene insertions. When the first edition of Agrobacterium Protocols was published in 1995, only a handful of plants could be routinely transformed using Agrobacterium. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is now commonly used to introduce DNA into many plant species, including monocotyledon crop species that were previously considered non-hosts for Agrobacterium. Most remarkable are recent developments indicating that Agrobacterium can also be used to deliver DNA to non-plant species including bacteria, fungi, and even mammalian cells.
Part I. Agrobacterium Handling Culture and Maintenance of Agrobacterium Strains Arlene A. Wise, Zhenying Liu, and Andrew N. Binns Binary Vectors and Super-binary Vectors Toshihiko Komari, Yoshimitsu Takakura, Jun Ueki, Norio Kato, Yuji Ishida, and Yukoh Hiei Three Methods for the Introduction of Foreign DNA into Agrobacterium Arlene A. Wise, Zhenying Liu, and Andrew N. Binns Integration of Genes into the Chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 Lan-Ying Lee Nucleic Acid Extraction from Agrobacterium Strains Arlene A. Wise, Zhenying Liu, and Andrew N. Binns Agrobacterium Virulence Gene Induction Stanton B. Gelvin Part II. Model Plants Arabidopsis thaliana Floral Dip Transformation Method Andrew Bent Agrobacterium Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots: A Quantitative Assay Stanton B. Gelvin Medicago truncatula Transformation Using Leaf Explants Viviane Cosson, Patricia Durand, Isabelle d'Erfurth, Adam Kondorosi, and Pascal Ratet Medicago truncatula Transformation Using Cotyledon Explants Elane Wright, Richard A. Dixon, and Zeng-Yu Wang Medicago truncatula Transformation Using Root Explants Cynthia Crane, Richard A. Dixon, and Zeng-Yu Wang Nicotiana (Nicotiana tobaccum, Nicotiana benthamiana) Tom Clemente Generation of Composite Plants Using Agrobacterium rhizogenes Christopher G. Taylor, Beth Fuchs, Ray Collier, and W. Kevin Lutke Part III. Cereal Crops Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) John Jacobsen, Ingrid Venables, Ming-Bo Wang, Peter Matthews, Michael Ayliffe, and Frank Gubler Maize (Zea mays L.) Bronwyn R. Frame, Tina Paque, and Kan Wang Indica Rice (Oryza sativa, BR29 and IR64) Karabi Datta and Swapan Kumar Datta Japonica Rice Varieties (Oryza sativa, Nipponbare, and Others) Philippe Hervé and Toshiaki Kayano Rye (Secale cereale L.) Fredy Altpeter Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) Zuo-yu Zhao Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Yuechun Wan and Jeanne Layton Part IV. Industrial Plants Canola (Brassica napus L.) Vinitha Cardoza and C. Neal Stewart, Jr. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Keerti S. Rathore, Ganesan Sunilkumar, and LeAnne M. Campbell Indian Mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.] Ksenija Gasic and Schuyler S. Korban Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Dalia M. Lewi, H. Esteban Hopp, and Alejandro S. Escandón Part V. Legume Plants Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Deborah A. Samac and Sandra Austin-Phillips Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Kiran Kumar Sharma, Pooja Bhatnagar-Mathur, and Boddu Jayanand Clovers (Trifolium spp.) Aidyn Mouradov, Stephen Panter, Marcel Labandera, Emma Ludlow, Michael Emmerling, and German Spangenberg Peas (Pisum sativum L.) Jan Grant and Pauline Cooper Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Kiran Kumar Sharma and Pooja Bhatnagar-Mathur Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp.) Kiran Kumar Sharma, Gopinath Sreelatha, and Sunitha Dayal Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Michael L. Sullivan and Kenneth H. Quesenberry Soybean (Glycine max) Transformation Using Mature Cotyledonary Node Explants Paula M. Olhoft, Christopher M. Donovan, and David A. Somers Soybean (Glycine max) Transformation Using Immature Cotyledon Explants Tae-Seok Ko, Schuyler S. Korban, and David A. Somers Tepary Bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) Mukund Zambre, Marc Van Montagu, Geert Angenon, and Nancy Terryn Part VI. Vegetable Plants Brassica oleracea Penny A. C. Sparrow, Philip J. Dale, and Judith A. Irwin Cucumber (Cucumis sativus