International Review of Cytology
A Survey of Cell Biology

International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology Series, Vol. 231

Coordinator: Jeon Kwang W.

Language: Anglais
Cover of the book International Review of Cytology

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· 15.2x22.9 cm · Hardback
The acclaimed International Review of Cytology series presents current advances and reviews in cell biology, both plant and animal. Articles address structure and control of gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic interactions, control of cell development and differentiation, and cell transformation and growth. Authored by some of the foremost scientists in the field, each volume provides up-to-date information and directions for future research. Contributors to this volume are

  • The acclaimed International Review of Cytology series presents current advances and reviews in cell biology, both plant and animal
  • Articles address structure and control of gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic interactions, control of cell development and differentiation, and cell transformation and growth
  • Authored by some of the foremost scientists in the field, each volume provides up-to-date information and directions for future research
Role of Mucins in the Function of the Corneal and Conjunctival Epithelium; Recent Advance in Cell Biology of Polycystic Kidney Disease; Estrogen Receptos in the Spinal Cord, Sensory Ganglia and Pelvic Autonomic Ganglia; Regulatory Pathways in Lacrimal Gland Epithelium; Regulation by RNA.
Cell and molecular biologists, developmental biologists, physiologists (organ level), biomedical scientists, and biochemists studying cell-cell interactions, cell variation, and evolution.
Kwang Jeon received his Ph.D. in cell physiology at King’s College, University of London, UK, in 1964 and taught at SUNY Buffalo and University of Tennessee. His research was concerned with the biogenesis and function of cell components in two major areas: Integration of intracellular symbionts into host cells leading to the acquisition of new cell components and cell variation; Membrane-protein recycling during endo- and exocytosis.