Handbook of Food Proteins

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Language: Anglais
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464 p. · Paperback
Traditionally a source of nutrition, proteins are also added to foods for their ability to form gels and stabilise emulsions, among other properties. The range of specialised protein ingredients used in foods is increasing. Handbook of food proteins provides an authoritative overview of the characteristics, functionalities and applications of different proteins of importance to the food industry in one convenient volume.

The introductory chapter provides an overview of proteins and their uses in foods. The following chapters each focus on a particular protein ingredient or group of ingredients covering their origins, production, properties and applications. The proteins discussed are caseins, whey proteins, gelatin and other meat-derived protein ingredients, seafood proteins, egg proteins, soy proteins, pea and other legume proteins, mycoprotein, wheat gluten, canola and other oilseed proteins, algal proteins and potato protein. A chapter on texturised vegetable proteins completes the volume. Innovative products and potential methods for improving nutrition and diet using these proteins are described.

With its distinguished editors and international team of expert contributors Handbook of food proteins is an invaluable reference tool for professionals using food protein ingredients for both food and other applications.
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Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
Preface

Chapter 1: Introduction to food proteins
Abstract:
. 1.1 Introduction
. 1.2 Structure of protein
. 1.3 Functional properties of proteins
. 1.4 Scope of this book

Chapter 2: Caseins
Abstract:
. 2.1 Introduction
. 2.2 Manufacture of casein-based ingredients
. 2.3 Structure and properties
. 2.4 Uses and applications of casein-based ingredients
. 2.5 Interactions with other ingredients
. 2.6 Technical data and specifications
. 2.7 Regulatory status

Chapter 3: Whey proteins
Abstract:
. 3.1 Introduction
. 3.2 Manufacture of whey protein ingredients
. 3.3 Chemistry of the major whey proteins
. 3.4 Technical data
. 3.5 Uses and applications of whey protein ingredients
. 3.6 Whey protein hydrolysates
. 3.7 Regulatory status
. 3.8 Future trends
. 3.9 Sources of further information and advice
. 3.10 Acknowledgements

Chapter 4: Meat protein ingredients
Abstract:
. 4.1 Introduction
. 4.2 Sources of meat protein ingredients
. 4.3 Lean tissue protein ingredients
. 4.4 Connective tissue protein ingredients
. 4.5 Hydrolysates and flavors
. 4.6 Blood protein ingredients
. 4.7 Future trends
. 4.8 Acknowledgment

Chapter 5: Gelatin
Abstract:
. 5.1 Introduction
. 5.2 Manufacturing gelatin
. 5.3 Regulations, technical data and standard quality test methods
. 5.4 Chemical composition and physical properties of collagens and gelatins
. 5.5 Gelatin derivatives
. 5.6 Applications of gelatin
. 5.7 Acknowledgements

Chapter 6: Seafood proteins
Abstract:
. 6.1 Introduction
. 6.2 Chemistry of seafood proteins
. 6.3 Seafood proteins as a component of the human diet
. 6.4 Comparison of seafood proteins with vegetable and other animal proteins
. 6.5 Functional properties of seafood proteins
. 6.6 Factors affecting functional properties of seafood proteins
. 6.7 Isolation and recovery of fish muscle proteins from whole fish and fish processing by-products
. 6.8 Products derived from seafood proteins
. 6.9 Environmental considerations for continuous sustainability of proteins from aquatic resources
. 6.10 Regulatory aspects of seafood protein: allergies to seafood proteins

Chapter 7: Egg proteins

Abstract:
. 7.1 Introduction
. 7.2 Egg white: chemical composition and structure
. 7.3 Manufacture of egg white ingredients
. 7.4 Functional properties of egg white
. 7.5 Conclusion: egg white
. 7.6 Egg yolk: chemical composition and structure
. 7.7 Manufacture of egg yolk ingredients and egg yolk separation
. 7.8 Functional properties of egg yolk
. 7.9 Conclusion: egg yolk
. 7.10 Regulatory status: egg proteins as food allergens

Chapter 8: Soy proteins
Abstract:
. 8.1 Introduction
. 8.2 Soybean storage proteins: structure-function relationship of β -conglycinin and glycinin
. 8.3 Soy protein as a food ingredient
. 8.4 Improving soy protein functionality
. 8.5 Conclusion

Chapter 9: Peas and other legume proteins
Abstract:
. 9.1 Introduction
. 9.2 Processing and protein isolation
. 9.3 Characterization of pea and other legume proteins and isolates
. 9.4 Functional properties in isolates and ways of improving them
. 9.5 Utilization of pea and other legume proteins in foods
. 9.6 Future challenges and trends in using peas and other legume proteins

Chapter 10: Wheat gluten: production, properties and application

Abstract:
. 10.1 Introduction
. 10.2 World production and trade
. 10.3 Wheat gluten manufacturing processes
. 10.4 Composition and protein structure
. 10.5 Functional and sensory properties
. 10.6 Modification of gluten for new functional properties
. 10.7 Uses and applications of wheat gluten
. 10.8 Regulatory status and gluten intolerance
. 10.9 Future trends

Chapter 11: Canola and other oilseed proteins
Abstract:
. 11.1 Introduction
. 11.2 Processing and protein isolation
. 11.3 Characterization of canola and other oilseed proteins and isolates
. 11.4 Functional properties
. 11.5 Utilization of canola and other oilseed proteins
. 11.6 Issues in using canola and other oilseed proteins

Chapter 12: Potato proteins
Abstract:
. 12.1 Introduction
. 12.2 Physico-chemical properties of the different potato proteins
. 12.3 Functionality of different types of potato proteins
. 12.4 Potato protein isolation
. 12.5 Specifications of industrially produced potato protein preparations
. 12.6 Uses and applications
. 12.7 Regulatory status and safety

Chapter 13: Mycoprotein: origins, production and properties
Abstract:
. 13.1 Introduction
. 13.2 Manufacture of mycoprotein
. 13.3 The production of foods from mycoprotein
. 13.4 Texture creation in mycoprotein
. 13.5 Nutritional properties of mycoprotein
. 13.6 Regulatory status
. 13.7 Future trends: mycoprotein and sustainability

Chapter 14: Algal proteins
Abstract:
. 14.1 Introduction
. 14.2 Cultivation and production of algae and algal proteins
. 14.3 Composition of algal proteins
. 14.4 Extraction procedures and processing of algal proteins
. 14.5 Functional properties of algal proteins
. 14.6 Nutritional quality of algal proteins
. 14.7 Toxicological and safety aspects
. 14.8 Utilisation of algal proteins
. 14.9 Future trends

Chapter 15: Texturized vegetable proteins
Abstract:
. 15.1 Introduction
. 15.2 Raw materials for textured vegetable protein
. 15.3 Soy processing to generate raw materials for texturization
. 15.4 Processing other crops to generate raw materials for texturization
. 15.5 Processes for making textured vegetable protein
. 15.6 Types of textured vegetable proteins
. 15.7 Uses of texturized vegetable protein

Index