Earth's Oldest Rocks (2nd Ed.)

Coordinators: Van Kranendonk Martin J., Bennett Vickie, Hoffmann Elis

Language: Anglais
Cover of the book Earth's Oldest Rocks

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220.63 €

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900 p. · 21.6x27.6 cm · Paperback

Earth?s Oldest Rocks, 2e, is the only single reference source for geological research of the early Earth. The new edition is an up-to-date collection of scientific articles on all aspects of the early history of the Earth, from planetary accretion at 4.567 billion years ago (Ga) to the onset of modern-style plate tectonics at 3.2 Ga. Since the first edition published, significant new advances have been made in our understanding of events and processes on early Earth, given new discoveries and advances in technology.

Earth?s Oldest Rocks, 2e, includes contributions from over 100 authors, all of whom are experts in their respective fields. The research in this reference concentrates on what is gleaned directly from the existing rock record to understand how our planet formed and evolved during the planetary accretion phase, formation of the first crust, the changing dynamics of the mantle and style of tectonics, life?s foothold and early development, and mineral deposits. It is of interest for academics, students, and interested public alike.



  • Features more than 150 pages of new material, including new chapters on topics like early solar system materials, oldest evidence of life on Earth, and modelling early Earth tectonics
  • Contains comprehensive reviews of areas of ancient lithosphere on Earth, of planetary accretion processes, and of meteorites
  • Focuses on specific aspects of early Earth, including oldest putative life forms, evidence of the composition of the ancient atmosphere-hydrosphere, and the oldest evidence for subduction-accretion
  • Presents an overview of geological processes and model of the tectonic framework on early Earth

1. Introduction 2. Planetary accretion and the Hadean to Eoarchaean Earth - Building the Foundation 3. Eo- to Paleoarchean gneiss complexes 4. Eo- to Paleoarchean greenstone belts 5. Mineral Deposits on early Earth 6. Life on Early Earth 7. Tectonics on early Earth